The Kentucky Trinity: Burgoo, Barbecue and Bourbon

Burgoo, barbecue and bourbon, historically acknowledged as the trinity of good taste in Kentucky, have traditional roots going back to the days of Daniel Boone. W.A. Schmid, a chef and food historian, delves deep into the cultural heritage of these foods in his book, Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon: A Kentucky Culinary Trinity (University Press of Kentucky 2021).

Known as “the gumbo of the Bluegrass,” burgoo is a meat stew consisting of a variety of meats that were often smoked as that’s one of the ways they preserved food back then. The list of ingredients included at least one “bird of the air” and at least one “beast of the field.” The latter could include squirrel, ground hog, lamb, pork jowl, and rabbit. Added to that were whatever vegetables (think corn, tomatoes, turnips, potatoes, carrots, onions, okra, and lima beans) were either in season or still stored and edible in the larder. Sometimes oysters, oatmeal and/or pearl barley were thrown in as well. Schmid also includes, among his many burgoo recipes, one that feeds 10,000 which calls for a ton and a half of beef (I’m not including it but if you’re expecting a huge crowd over email me and I’ll send it) and another that makes 1200 gallons.

“Often you’ll find this dish paired with one of the Commonwealth’s other favorite exports, bourbon, and the state’s distinctive barbecue,” writes Schmid, who immersed himself in archives of early cookbooks.

He takes us back to the days of Daniel Boone, uncovering forgotten recipes of regional dishes and such lost recipes as Mush Biscuits and Half Moon Fried Pies. There are numerous recipes for burgoo starting from early pioneer days, each unique depending on the region, food tastes, and what ingredients were easily sourced. Burgoo was an early community dish with people coming together to prepare it in vast amounts for celebrations.

Women would gather for peeling parties which meant endlessly peeling and dicing vegetables while men would stir the ingredients as they simmered in the huge pots throughout the night, most likely with sips of bourbon to keep them enthused about the task. Whether women got to sip bourbon too, we can only hope so. But in an age where water wasn’t safe to drink and even children were given wine, cider, small beer, and the dregs of their parents sweetened spirits to drink, I’m guessing so.

As for the name burgoo, well, no one, not even Schmid is sure where it comes from.

“It may have described an oatmeal porridge that was served to English sailors in the mid-1700s, or it may have come from the small town of Bergoo, West Virginia,” Schmid hypothesized. The word might also be a slur of bird stew or perhaps bulger; it could also be a mispronunciation of barbecue, ragout, or an amalgam of the lot. If the oatmeal story is true, burgoo continued as a military staple as it became a hearty stew for soldiers who could travel light and hunt and gather ingredients ‘from wild things in the woods’ once they stopped moving for the day—so they did not have to move the supplies from one location to another.”

Of course, a hearty burgoo demands a great bourbon drink and Schmid offers quite a few of those as well. One name I’m particularly taken with is called Kentucky Fog, presumably because over-consumption left one in a fog. Other great names for bourbon drinks mentioned in the book are Moon Glow, Bourbaree, and the Hot Tom and Jerry.

The following recipes are from Burgoo, Barbecue, and Bourbon.

Kentucky Fog

12 servings

  • 1 quart Kentucky bourbon
  • 1 quart strong coffee
  • 1 quart vanilla ice cream

Combine the ingredients in a punch bowl and serve.

Moon Glow

  • Crushed ice
  • 1½ ounces bourbon
  • 2 ounces cranberry juice
  • 2 ounces orange juice
  • 2 teaspoons maraschino cherry juice

Pack a tall glass with crushed ice. Add the cranberry juice and the orange juice. Add the maraschino cherry juice. Then add the bourbon. Stir well with a bar spoon and garnish with 2 maraschino cherries and a straw.

Burgoo

This recipe is used at Keeneland, the famous racetrack in Lexington, Kentucky and dates back to 1939.

  • Oil
  • 3 pounds stew meat
  • 1 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1 teaspoon sage
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1 cup celery, diced
  • 1 cup carrot, diced
  • 1 cup onion, diced
  • 12-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
  • 2 16-ounce cans mixed vegetables
  • 7-ounce can tomato purée
  • 2 pounds fresh okra, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon beef base
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 cup sherry
  • 3 pounds potatoes, peeled and diced
  • Cornstarch

Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven. Brown the stew meat with the herbs and garlic. Add the remaining ingredients, except the cornstarch, and cover with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for at least 3 hours. Adjust seasonings to taste and thicken with cornstarch.

Spoonbread with Bourbon

  • 6 servings
  • 2 cups water, boiling
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 3 egg yolks, beaten
  • 3 egg whites, stiffly beaten
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons lard
  • 1 tablespoon bourbon

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Boil the water; add the lard and butter; to this mixture add

the cornmeal, egg yolks, and baking soda. Stir in the buttermilk and stiffly beaten egg whites. Add the bourbon and pour into a buttered casserole dish. Bake for 35 minutes.

Original Kentucky Whiskey Cake

15–20 servings

  • 5 cups flour, sifted
  • 1 pound sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • ¾ pound butter
  • 6 eggs, separated and beaten
  • 1 pint Kentucky bourbon
  • 1 pound candied cherries, cut in pieces
  • 2 teaspoons nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 pound shelled pecans
  • ½ pound golden raisins, halved, or ½ pound dates, chopped

Soak cherries and raisins in bourbon overnight.

Preheat oven to 250–275 degrees F.

Cream the butter and sugars until fluffy. Add the egg yolks

and beat well. To the butter and egg mixture, add the soaked fruit and the remaining liquid alternately with the flour. Reserve a small amount of flour for the nuts. Add the nutmeg and baking powder. Fold in the beaten egg whites. Add the lightly floured pecans last. Bake in a large, greased tube pan that has been lined with 3 layers of greased brown paper. Bake for 3–4 hours. Watch baking time carefully.

Store any leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Richard Hougen was the manager of the Boone Tavern Hotel of Berea College and the author of several cookbooks, including Look No Further: A Cookbook of Favorite Recipes from Boone Tavern Hotel, Berea College, Kentucky, Hougen includes the recipe for Boone Tavern Cornsticks. He notes at the bottom of the recipe, adapted here, how important it is to “heat well-greased cornstick pan to smoking hot on top of the stove before pouring in your batter.

Boone Tavern Hotel Cornsticks

  • 2 cups white cornmeal
  • ½ cup flour
  • 2 eggs, well beaten
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons lard, melted

Preheat oven to 450–500 degrees F.

Sift the flour, cornmeal, salt, and baking powder together.

Mix the baking soda with the buttermilk, and then add to the dry ingredients; beat well. Add the eggs and beat. Add the lard. Mix well. Pour the batter into very hot well-greased cornstick pans on

top of stove, filling the pans to level.

Place pans on the lower shelf of the oven and bake for 8 minutes. Move the pans to the upper shelf and bake for an additional 5–10 minutes.

The top 10 reasons to city-break in Cork this autumn

With its warrens of narrow streets, vibrant spirit and warm welcome, Cork is the perfect city break destination for when the nights are drawing in.

Here are 10 reasons why you should be in this historic city as the seasons switch.

1. Food worth travelling for

Thanks to an abundance of high-quality local producers and a profusion of creative and passionate chefs, Cork has a deserving reputation as Ireland’s food capital. Whether you’re browsing the overflowing stalls at the famous and centuries-old English Market or sampling dishes at the city’s amazing restaurants, pubs and cafés, great food will always be on the menu.

2. And all that jazz

Having hosted jazz greats such as Ella Fitzgerald, Oscar Peterson and Mel Tormé throughout its long history, the lively Cork Jazz Festival pulls in thousands of music fans every October. Sponsored by Guinness and with events taking place in pubs and venues all across Cork, the city will be buzzing once again this autumn with groundbreaking music, fun and charm from 27 – 30 October.

3. Titanic tales

One of the most popular day trips from Cork city is to the town of Cobh, a beautiful Irish seaport with a bittersweet history. Once the main point of emigration from Ireland, Cobh was the Titanic’s last port of call before she sailed onwards to her fate. The story is told magnificently at the Titanic Experience located in the old White Star Line offices on the seafront.

4. Epic Cork City Gaol

Cork City Gaol ( museum), Cork, Ireland

Experience life in the nineteenth and early twentieth century at Cork City Gaol, a museum that offers a unique insight into the city’s history, both inside and outside of the prison walls. Take a trip back in time and wander through the wings of the gaol, accompanied by the shuffling feet of inmates and the jingle of the warders’ keys.

5. City sight-seeing

You can easily explore Cork on foot, but it’s worth checking out one of the excellent, locally led tours to find out what really makes Ireland’s second city tick. Cork City Walks are full of history and folklore, or you can jump on an open-top double-decker bus and see the sights with Cork City Tours.

6. Art galleries galore

Crawford Art Gallery

As a former European Capital of Culture, Cork is packed with museums, galleries, theatres, music and dance academies and more. You will find everything from opera to street art within the thriving art and culture scene, with the Crawford Art Gallery, the Glucksman Gallery and the Lavit Gallery among the best visual art spaces to make a beeline for.

Cobh, County Cork

 

7. The Wild Atlantic Way

One of the best sections of the 2,500km Wild Atlantic Way route starts – or ends – in Kinsale, just half an hour away from Cork city. This makes the city the perfect jumping-off point for exploring the breath-taking scenery and remote peninsulas of West Cork.

8. Ring the Shandon Bells

A visit to Cork isn’t complete without climbing to the belfry of the eighteenth-century St Anne’s Church to ring the world-famous Shandon Bells. There are 135 steps to reach the viewing balcony, but the reward is fantastic panoramic views over the city and surrounding countryside.

Old_Cork_Waterworks_Experience_Entrance

9. Fitzgerald Park

For a gorgeous feel of autumn foliage in Cork, head down to Fitzgerald Park on the banks of the River Lee. Home to Cork Public Museum, the Sky Garden, a series of sculptures, cafés, walks and more, the park offers a quiet retreat from the hustle and bustle of the city.

10. You can kiss the Blarney Stone

The world-famous Blarney Castle, home of the iconic Blarney Stone, is one of Ireland’s top attractions and is located just ten minutes from Cork city. Legend has it that kissing the Blarney Stone will give you the ‘gift of the gab’ – as in great eloquence or persuasiveness. A great reason to go!
 
www.ireland.com

Supper Clubs: An American Dining Experience

Neon lights. Big cars with rich men and beautiful dames. Martinis and music. Relish trays and super-sized steaks. Tucked away on country roads—perfect for bootleggers to deliver their goods in the dark of night or on the streets of big cities where midnight deliveries are no problem.

These are the supper clubs of old and while these vestiges of a glamorous past maybe somewhat different now, author Ron Faiola chronicles it all in his series of book, including the most recent, “The Wisconsin Supper Clubs Story: An Illustrated History, with Relish” (Agate Midway 2021; $26.66). His other two books, “Wisconsin Supper Clubs: An Old Fashioned Experience” and “Wisconsin Supper Clubs: Another Round” as well as his movie, Wisconsin Supper Clubs: An Old Fashioned Experience makes Faiola a supper club expert. His books, which make for great reading, are also perfect as guidebooks, taking us on a round of supper clubs still in business.

In his latest book, Faiola, a native of Wisconsin a state that seems to have the most of supper clubs of any state, went deep into their history and along the way dispelled at least one major legend—that the first American supper club was established in the 1920s in Beverly Hills, California by Milwaukee native Lawrence Frank.

 “It always bothered me because it named the guy, but not the supper club,” said Faiola.  “And why Beverly Hills and not New York City or even Wisconsin?  Once I delved into the Frank family history, I had my answers which became chapter one in the book.”

There was another legend to question as well. Faiola has visited close to 150 of the places. But there was a guy named Al (last name Capone) who seemed to have visited even more—at least according to claims by owners. Faiola demolished that one as well.

Join us in a conversation with Faiola.

The resurgence of supper clubs has been going on for several years.  It first began when my documentary, Wisconsin Supper Clubs – An Old Fashioned Experience,” was released in 2011. 

Additionally, once the first book–“Wisconsin Supper Clubs: An Old Fashioned Experience” was released, instead of sitting on a coffee table, people brought their copies along on trips to supper clubs and had the owners and staff sign their pages. They’d put menus and make notes about the drinks and food that they had. That snowballed as more people saw what others were doing.  It was fun for them and the supper club owners loved the attention.  I’ve heard from so many owners about the number of books they’ve signed.  They’re very proud of that.  

More recently, when all restaurants closed as the pandemic started, people thought they were going to lose their favorite supper clubs.  Once clubs started reopening, even just for take-out orders, customers were very supportive.  As clubs fully reopened, diners returned in droves in the summer of 2020 and even more so during 2021.  I’ve seen photos on social media of people standing in line waiting to get into supper clubs.  Last summer the wait for a table at Ishnala was three to four hours and yet people were cheerfully tailgating in the parking lot!  The great return to the Restaurants of Yesteryear has not only drawn more people to the clubs, but there is now a wide range of supper club souvenirs: glasses, apparel, posters, and even more books.  

Can you share a story or two about discoveries that most surprised you?

One of the things that surprised me the most was that the price of food was about the same as today when adjusted for inflation.  I tell people to multiply the menu prices they see in the book by 10, so those $3.95 T-bone steaks and 60¢ old fashioneds in 1950 would be about $39.50 and $6.00 today.

If readers wanted to take a road trip and visit some of your favorites that are still in business, which ones would you suggest?

Start by going to some of the supper clubs that are a little below the radar – Roepke’s Supper Club in Chilton, Pinewood Supper Club in Mosinee, The 615 Club or The Butterfly Club in Beloit or The Duck Inn in Delavan.  Then hit the more well-known clubs: Ishnala or the Del-Bar in the Wisconsin Dells, HobNob in Racine overlooking Lake Michigan, Five O’Clock Steakhouse in Milwaukee and The Buckhorn Supper Club in Milton with a great view of Lake Koshkonong.

Do you have a favorite supper club dish? Besides, the relish tray that is?

I enjoy a nice medium rare cut of prime rib, or a New York Strip, but one of my favorites that is only found in the southern part of Wisconsin is Shrimp de Jonghe.  It’s a Chicago recipe and is basically a garlicky, buttery shrimp casserole.  

How did you get interested in supper clubs?

I’ve always enjoyed going to supper clubs my whole life, whether it was around where I lived in the Milwaukee suburbs, or up north when I’d go fishing with my grandfather.  I got the idea to do the movie when I was working on a fish fry documentary–Fish Fry Night Milwaukee, 2009–and I was looking for a supper club fish fry to put in the movie.  I realized no one had documented supper clubs and there needed to be a light shined on that tradition.  I went on the road to visit 14 clubs in 2010 and the documentary aired on Milwaukee PBS in 2011 and was licensed to PBS stations nationwide for several years.

Anything else you’d like readers to know?

I’m going to be busy visiting even more supper clubs this summer (hint hint).   

Photo credits: Hoffman House courtesy of Bob Prosser. The El Dorado photo and the Ray Bussler photo are Photo courtesy Ron Faiola

Traveling Through Time: Down the Danube Narrows to Weltenburg Abbey

Weltenburg Abbey was more than four centuries old before the monks first began brewing ale—or at least ale worth noting–in 1050. Now vying for the title of the oldest monastic brewery in the world (Weihenstephan Abbey also claims the honor), they set their claim on maintaining the original brewing process. Like the beer, much is as it was remains at the Abbey, the somewhat plain exterior of the cathedral opens onto an elaborately ornate and gilded interior. Services are still held regularly, and monks still live and work on the premises. And just as abbeys were places for gatherings for a millennium and more, Weltenburg also remains a destination. Located 25 miles west of the charming Bavarian city of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage City and just three miles from Kelheim, it is accessible by car. But I totally like immersing myself in history and my goal today is to replicate—as much as I can—the 1050 experience.

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Long Wall and St. Nepomuk

On the ferry from Kelheim, I watch as the boat’s wake cuts through waters reflecting the dark greens of dense woods and whites of limestone rocks of the Fränkische Alb mountains, some rising 300-feet high. Winds, water and time have carved caves and nooks in the limestone and in one of these crannies on an expansive stretch of stone called the Long Wall someone has tucked a statue of St. Nepomuk, the patron saint of water and bridges who was drowned when he refused to reveal the confessions made to him by the Queen of Bavaria. Her husband must have really wanted to know what she was up to.

The Danube Narrows

Today it will take 40 minutes to travel the Danube Narrows, an ancient waterway to and from Weltenburg Abbey or if you want to be really German about it, Weltenburger Klosterbrauerei, a sprawling complex of Baroque stone buildings surrounded by the lush rural beauty of Southern Bavaria.

There are times when the river is a lively place with small boats passing by and bicyclists and hikers making their way along the riverbank. Then suddenly, navigating a bend, it’s all calm waters and quiet.  I imagine this is how it was when pilgrims and tradesmen (and hopefully tradeswomen as well) came to the abbey to retreat from the world, rest or conduct business. It was a time when travel was mainly by water as roads barely existed and their trip would have taken much longer without our gas powered engines. But the sight they saw when making the final curve is much the same as today—Weltenburg’s blue tower roof and the washed pink walls.

Weltenburger Klosterbrauerei

The abbey sits on a bend of the river and in front is a small sandy beach and shallow waters where people play. It’s hot today—a heat wave is moving across Europe—and I envy them as the water looks cool and refreshing. But history calls and instead I move up the walk leading from the dock to the entrance already awed by the size and beauty of the place.

There are always hard choices and today I need to decide whether to tour first (there are self-guided and guided tours available) or take a seat in the sun at the biergarten, It appears that most people have chosen the latter and rather than wait for a table or sit inside the restaurant, I enter the church.

St. Georg Church

We’re talking seriously rococo inside, an overdrive of theatrical flourishes mixed with more Gothic elements. Paintings date back to the 1300s, a statue of the church’s namesake St. George or St. Georg as its spelled here, sculpted in smooth, sleek marble, rides his horse most likely on his way to slay the dragon. The main room, its ceiling 65-feet high, has alcoves off to the sides, each one just as ornate. It’s hard to take in everything at once, the artistry, pageantry and craftsmanship are so amazing.  Standing near a group tour, I hear phrases like “eight ionic columns, Weltenburg marble and gold fresco” and hurriedly write the words down as it helps sort out this wonderment of riches.

Bavarian Fare

Back outside, I spot an empty table and grab it. Addicted to German fare (yes, really), I order pigs’ knuckle known as schweinshaxe, schnitzel and even though I’m in Bavarian and not the Black Forest (hey, it’s nearby) the famous cake from that region. Of course, I need a glass of their Kloster Barock Dunkel—an almost black in color ale which is still made on site in a rock cave and then sent by pipeline to the monastery taps. Also available—to drink or take home, there is a gift store of course–are other brews and such medicinal spirits as their Weltenburg monastery bitters and liqueurs. And if you want to go full abbey, there’s their klosterkas and monastery sausage both based on ancient Weltenburg recipes.

Maybe I shouldn’t have eaten that last schnitzel and definitely not the cake. To assuage my conscience, I climb the mountain path as it winds past the Stations of the Cross. It’s steep but the gaps in the woods offer commanding views of the valley, abbey and gorge below. I briefly contemplate spending the night at the St. Georg Guest House to be able to walk the abbey grounds late at night when all the visitors are gone but I don’t have a reservation. Next time for sure.

The Oldest Wheat Beer Brewery in Bavaria

          Returning to Kelheim isn’t exactly like entering the 21st century. In the old town I wander the narrow streets snapping photos of perfectly maintained Medieval-era buildings just a short walk from the docks and on the way to where I parked my car, I let my friends talk me into stopping at Weisses Bauhaus Kelheim.

It’s a beautiful place, all wood, vaulted ceilings and archways leading from room to room. Outside we sit in, yes another beer garden, this one next to a small stream, and order a round of their wheat beer. Really, I had to since they’ve been brewing beer here since 1607, making the Weisses Brauhaus the oldest wheat beer brewery in Bavaria.

 

I’m not typically a beer lover but both the Kloster Barock Dunkel at the abbey and the TAP7 here, made from the original 1872 recipe, are robust and flavorful without bitterness or an overly hoppy taste. I’m driving so instead of more beer, I listen to the live music, enjoy the myriad of colorful blooms cascading from window boxes, baskets and containers and contemplate how I’ve spent the day moving through history and only now have reached the 17th century.

The Last of Howard Johnson’s

The loss of an American iconic restaurant and motel chain.:

HoJo’s no mo’: The last remnant of ‘the oranging of America’ has closed https://flip.it/l2.5Rk

It’s the End of an Era

Courtesy of New York Public Library.

With its signature orange roof, glistening pool with both high and low dives, restaurant with signature clam strips and 28 flavors of ice cream when nationwide chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla were typically all that was offered, Howard Johnson’s had it all.

Learn more about it in the book A History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon (American Palate).

Celebrate World Tapas Day this June 16

Tapas, those wonderful small plates of food served throughout Spain, have their own international holiday this June 16th. According to the Tourism Office of Spain, World Tapas Day is taking place in cities and destinations throughout Spain as a tribute to one of the most delicious culinary customs in the country: tapas. 

We love tapas and are reminded of the ones we had at the Castilla Termal Valbuena, a wonderful resort in the Colonial village of San Bernardo, one of the charming villages on the fabulous Ruta del Vine (wine trail) Ribera del Duero.

#WorldTapasDay

#DíaMundialdelaTapa

#MTJATapas

Grub Street: 2022 James Beard Award Winners: The Full List

Grub Street: 2022 James Beard Award Winners: The Full List. https://www.grubstreet.com/2022/06/2022-james-beard-chef-and-restaurant-award-winners-full-list.html

What’s Happening Springtime Chicago

The stages of Chicago’s theaters are once again lighting up after more than a year of darkness with myriad new performances that capture Chicago’s creative spirit, including the North American tours of Come From Away, Hadestown, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, SIX, To Kill a Mockingbird and others. The recently reopened Steppenwolf Theatre Company now has a new $54 million arts and education center that includes a theatre-in-the-round is hosting the world-premiere of King James, an intimate exploration of the place that sports and athletes (think “King” LeBron James) occupy in our emotional lives and relationships.

More Chicago Theater Offerings

Chicago Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot and Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) Commissioner Erin Harkey have just announced the designation of 2022 as the “Year of Chicago Dance”, a yearlong collaborative initiative which will activate Chicago’s dance industry to address critical issues facing dancers and showcase dance performances, social dancing, and special events for the public in dozens of venues throughout the city. 

The Arts in the City

At the Art Institute of Chicago, a groundbreaking exhibit on Life and Afterlife in Ancient Egypt will be followed by the first major retrospective of French artist Paul CEZANNE to be exhibited in the U.S. in over 25 years. The Museum of Contemporary Art will present the first career-spanning retrospective of the internationally renowned Chicagoan Nick Cave in an exhibition titled NICK CAVE: FOROTHERMORE while the blockbuster immersive arts venue Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago will house Frida: Immersive Dream, an exploration of the Mexico-born artist’s work with 500,000 cubic feet of monumental large-scale projections animating Kahlo’s oeuvre, accompanied by a ravishing musical score. 

With careful COVID-19 protocols and social distancing in place, hybrid and live events will return to the city with the 

Chicago Restaurant Week will follow soon after in late March/early April, celebrating the city’s award-winning culinary scene with special prix fixe lunch and dinner menus (ranging from $25-$55) available via dine-in or takeout/delivery options. At long last EXPO Chicago, the international exhibition of contemporary and modern art, will return to Navy Pier in early April.

Come find out why Chicago was once again designated by Conde Nast Traveler’s readers as the Best Big City in the U.S. in 2021, for the fifth year in a row and check out what’s new for Winter/Spring 2022! Visit www.ChooseChicago.com for more information.

Chicago Accolades!

The Langham Chicago
  • The Michelin Guide celebrated Chicago’s resilient culinary scene by granting three new restaurants Michelin stars, including: 
  • Ever (West Loop – Two Star), where Chef Curtis Duffy and Michael Muser preside over a bespoke room in which fine dining enchants palates with complex flavors, stirring textures and visual fireworks;  
  • Moody Tongue (South Loop – Two Star), Jared Wentworth’s seasonal, ingredient-driven tasting menu concept housed in the Moody Tongue brewery building;
  • Porto (Bucktown – One Star), where Chef Marcos Campos’ style is anchored by his Spanish heritage and explores the Atlantic coast of Spain and Portugal through its conservas, seafood and specialty rice dishes.

Chicago’s New Accomodations

Canopy by Hilton Central Loop, located directly across the street from Willis Tower, in the epicenter of Chicago’s financial district, features a total of 215 total guest rooms (192 regular rooms and 23 suites). Famous attractions such as The Art Institute of Chicago, Millennium Park, and Chicago Riverwalk are less than 10 minutes away.

Open all day, the onsite Depot 226, a Bistro, market and coffee shop, offers a stylish, retro space that is inviting and comfortable and perfect for breakfast, brunch, lunch, or even a casual dinner. 

The Chicago Hotel Collection welcomed a new location in Millennium Park this summer featuring 4-Star all-suite accommodations with full kitchens, perfect for business, leisure, extended stays, corporate relocations, or large groups/families.

Guests will have access to an expert Concierge Team and receive an incredible daily amenity package featuring 3 drinks per night, free Wi-Fi, use of Peloton Bikes on-site with reservation, early check-in/late check-out, booking credits to use for their next stay when booked direct and a complimentary 1-year Club 1 Hotels membership. Another outpost, the Magnificent Mile Hotel & Suites, opened December 2021, just 350 feet from Michigan Avenue.

The LaSalle Hotel, Autograph Collection, situated in the heart of the Financial District, offers a sophisticated and tailored experience for business and leisure travelers.

Experience fine dining at Grill on 21, an elevated and modern take on the classic American grill concept featuring a focus on quality and sustainability. An expansive gym offers premiere TechnoGym equipment as well as Peloton bikes. World-class accommodations include spacious rooms averaging 430 square feet, oversized Calacatta marble bathrooms with luxurious walk-in showers, and a window-side marble top dining table. The hotel is projected to open in March 2022. 

Pendry Hotels & Resorts announced its further U.S. expansion with the renovation of the Art Deco Chicago landmark, the Carbide & Carbon Building (and former St. Jane Hotel), as Pendry Chicago in spring 2021.

Featuring 364 redesigned guestrooms and suites in a contemporary palette awash in warm minimal tones and comfortable finishes, the Pendry Chicago also features public spaces thoughtfully designed by Alessandro Munge’s Studio Munge. The hotel’s signature restaurant and bar concept, Venteux, is helmed by Executive Chef-Partner Donald Young (Temporis, Les Nomades, Bistrot Saveurs), Chicago’s youngest Michelin-starred chef, and overseen by hospitality and nightlife pioneer, Andy Masi, and his Clique Hospitality group. In addition, the hotel features a lobby bar and lounge, a spectacular rooftop lounge, 12,000 square feet of meetings and event space, curated fitness and wellness programming, and an extensive art collection.

The St. Regis Chicago is set to debut in 2022 as the 50th St. Regis globally. 

Through architectural ingenuity and a shimmering homage to sky and water, the 101-story St. Regis Chicago, designed by award-winning architect Jeanne Gang, has changed Chicago’s iconic skyline. It is now the third tallest building in Chicago, the 10th tallest in the United States, and the tallest building in the world designed by a female. The tower’s crystalline form was inspired by the facets of a shimmering gem and the building is coated in six varying shades of blue-green glass to reflect the changing colors of Lake Michigan. The Hotel will comprise the first 11 floors of the building, featuring 192 luxurious guest rooms, multiple signature dining options, a 12,000 square foot, world-class St. Regis Spa, a fitness center, indoor pool and outdoor sunken terrace with scenic views, a 5,000 square foot ballroom and 3,000 square feet of executive and pre-function space and the St. Regis Signature Butler Service. The Hotel’s backyard is a six-acre wide open botanical green space featuring a children’s play park, dog park, and attractive ornamental and water gardens.

Chicago Restaurant Week

This year marks the 15th anniversary of Chicago Restaurant Week (March 25-April 10, 2022), a celebration of the city’s award-winning culinary scene bringing together hundreds of the area’s top restaurants across more than thirty Chicago neighborhoods. This year there are 50+ women- and minority-owned restaurants participating (many for the first time) from neighborhoods as far ranging as South Shore and Bronzeville. Diners can enjoy special prix fixe menus from restaurants throughout Chicago and nearby suburbs, with multi-course meals available at $25 for brunch or lunch, and $39 and/or $55 for dinner (excluding beverages, tax, gratuity, and delivery fees). This year, diners will continue to have the flexibility to experience Chicago Restaurant Week through dine-in or takeout/delivery options.

Chicago Restaurants & Dining

Adalina

Opened last summer in Chicago’s Gold Coast neighborhood, Adalina serves a modern and engaging Italian menu by Michelin-starred chef Soo Ahn, previously with Band of Bohemia. Adalina’s menu creates a balance between Northern and Southern cuisines; guests can expect house-made extruded and stuffed pastas, imported meats and cheeses, and hand-selected beef and seafood selections.

Alla Vita

Opened in September 2021 in the West Loop neighborhood, Alla Vita (which means “to life” in Italian) is the newest concept from Executive Chef Lee Wolen and Boka Restaurant Group, serving a casual, family-style menu of fresh, delicious Italian food made simply with the best ingredients.

Chef/Owner Stephen Gillanders (S.K.Y., Somerset) debuted his newest concept, Apolonia in the South Loop in April 2021. Named after Gillanders’ grandmother, Apolonia offers seasonal, seafood-centric coastal European and Mediterranean fare. Pastry chef Tatum Sinclair has developed a collection of noteworthy items such as a savory black truffle puff bread, and a signature pistachio gelato. Sommelier Jelena Prodan has created a distinct beverage program with wines thoughtfully sourced from all around the globe, an expansive by-the-glass selection, and an exciting, one-of-a-kind vermouth program with custom-blended Apolonia vermouth on tap. 

In partnership with the famous Gibsons Restaurant Group. Chef José Andrés debuted Bazaar Meat and Bar Mar in December 2021 inside Bank of America’s new Chicago headquarters, near the Lyric Opera of Chicago. Bazaar Meat celebrates all things carnivorous, including personalized tasting menus featuring expertly dry-aged Wagyu and the like hand-selected from more than 400 cuts of meat, while Bar Mar is a true celebration of the bounty of the sea, with modern takes on iconic seafood classics like fried calamari and lobster rolls.

Eric Williams, owner of The Silver Room boutique, has partnered with global hospitality design trailblazer Cecilia Cuff of The Nascent Group on his newest venture: Bronzeville Winery. Opening in 2022, guests of the winery will enjoy a rotating wine list with selections from around the world highlighting African American-owned labels paired with an ever-changing seasonal menu that pays homage to the flavors of the African diaspora, paired with wine, craft cocktails and beer for every palate. The team’s goal in the design of the Winery is to encourage guests to spend time, to socialize and network in the space. To that end, the decor will feature a revolving art collection, and a state-of-the-art sound system will pipe in a well-curated playlist and live music. Programming will feature wine talks, art openings, and cultural events; the space will also be available for private events.

Esmé Chicago opened August 2021 in Lincoln Square, from Chef Jenner Tomaska and Katrina Bravo. This fine-dining concept is also mission-driven and community-focused as they partner with local artists on collaborative tasting menus.

Gordon Ramsay Burger, a new concept from celebrity chef and restaurateur Gordon Ramsay, opened in a 5,000 square foot space in the city’s River North neighborhood in December 2021. The Chicago location, equipped with an island bar and seating for 120, will be the second Gordon Ramsay Burger location in the U.S – and the chef’s first restaurant in Chicago. Alongside elevated, butter-based burgers (blending different cuts of meat to impart a bolder flavor), the developing menu also plans to include milkshakes, fries, vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options. There are also ketchup-laden hot dogs on the menu (a bold choice for a Chicago audience).

Hinoki Sushiko from Chef Otto Phan & Chef Gustavo Barahona, opened April 2021. This two-story space in the Elston corridor offers two types of chef-driven experiences under one roof: a 50-seat izakaya-style downstairs lounge serves traditional Japanese comfort food with a modern take, along with craft cocktails and Sake and a 40-person upstairs dining room (and 8-seat sushi counter) for Edomae-style Omakase dining serving a 15 piece meal.

Kitchen United MIX, a to-go food hall, is opening a second Chicago location in the former Wells St. Market.  Kitchen United MIX, the future of takeout & delivery, is the nation’s first “Multi-Restaurant Ordering” to-go experience, the only destination that allows foodie fans who love variety to order meals from 10+ restaurants, all on the same bill. They have locations around the nation, including one in Chicago’s River North neighborhood.  The new 10,500 square-foot facility houses local, regional and national restaurant brands, including Hawaiian Bros, Greenleaf, Siri Indian Express, Trejo’s Tacos, Dog Haus, Plant B and more. 

Black owned Kitchen + Kocktails, which made its debut last summer 2021, has taken the city by storm. From flavored fried chicken and lobster tails, to shrimp and grits and southern classics with a twist, this is a great addition to the River North culinary scene. 

KOVAL Distillery opened its hotly anticipated tasting room last fall on Chicago’s Malt Row, named for the bevy of breweries in the Ravenswood neighborhood. The sun-filled tasting room, outfitted with a marble bar and leather sofas, seats 96. French doors open to an ivy-covered outdoor patio that accommodates up to 30 people. Guests can sample flights of whiskey and gin, or try cocktails made with KOVAL spirits and paired with small bites.

DineAmic Hospitality reinvented its popular, decade-old concept Public House, as Radio Room last summer, an American restaurant sports bar and music lounge set. The 10,000-square-foot space can seat 300 guests at full capacity in four unique spaces and becomes a go-to for everything from game day to late-night jam sessions.

A 15-foot stage is backlit with a wall of smart marquee bulbs that strobe and dance with the music during late-night live performances or laid-back sets at brunch, and the design theme juxtaposes vintage kitsch with today’s tech. At The Studio, an intimate private event and daytime dining space inspired by a real-life recording studio, guests can partake in blue-tooth headphone karaoke that only their party can hear. Meanwhile, nostalgia reigns in The Deck, a 10-by-10-foot space housing the Pop-A-Shot Shot Bar, where guests can shoot baskets and sip throwback shooters like Flaming Doctor Peppers and Pickle-backs. Chef Nolan Narut, former Executive Chef of Ella Elli and Stefani Prime, hits all the right notes with a menu inspired by American Southern comfort food from culinary cities like Nashville and Charleston but made with fresh, local ingredients.

Joe Flamm, the South Side Chicago native, Spiaggia alum and Season 15 winner of Top Chef, debuted Rose Mary in April 2021, inspired by his Italian heritage and the bold, bright flavors of Croatian cuisine.

The space, located in the historic Fulton Market District and named for Flamm’s grandmothers, as well as the herb rosemary which grows natively along the Italian and Croatian coastlines, offers a seasonal menu of rustic yet refined dishes that encapsulate what Flamm has coined “Adriatic drinking food.” Designed by award-winning Los Angeles-based firm Studio UNLTD, the dynamic interior with whitewashed brick walls, honey-colored oak millwork, and pale stone surfaces—all accented by moments of red clay and deep, azure blue tilework—reflects the utilitarian yet celebratory spirit of traditional family-run, age-old taverns in Croatia known as konobas. Rose Mary has also taken second place in TimeOut’s list of The 21 best new restaurants in the world right now.

In Summer 2021, José Andrés, chef, restaurateur and founder of the nonprofit World Central Kitchen, and his ThinkFoodGroup — opened Jaleo, in River North, bringing alive the spirit and flavors of modern-day Spain through an impressive assortment of tapas, paellas, sangrias, Spanish wines and sherries, all within a festive, casual atmosphere. In fall, he opened Pigtail, an intimate, speakeasy-style bar on the lower level of Jaleo, taking its name from the ibérico pork which infuses almost every dish on the menu (Pig), and the bespoke cocktails (tail). 

Time Out Market Chicago is excited to add to its carefully curated showcase of delicious cuisine with Lil Amaru set to open late January 2022 . A spinoff of its sister restaurant Amaru, located in Chicago’s Wicker Park neighborhood, Lil Amaru will feature globally inspired Latin Street Food and Tacos.  

Opened this past April 2021 in Chicago’s River North neighborhood, Tree House is a flourishing, nature-inspired, chef-driven bar and restaurant serving up elevated renditions of comfort food and bar classics, including three distinct styles of pizza. Marco Colin (The Publican, Soho House, Alinea), executive chef at La Luna Chicago, will take on the additional role of executive chef at Tree House with a high quality, ingredient-focused approach to modern Italian fare. The kitchen’s two ovens, a custom-built, wood-burning brick oven and traditional deck oven, serve up Tree House’s three styles of pizza. The bar program pairs well with chef Colin’s playful menus, featuring an array of vibrant cocktails curated for celebrating, such as Negronis, spritzers and frozen cocktails. In full capacity, the restaurant holds 200-seats, glistening with a disco ball fixture overhead and an aesthetic enlivened through fixtures like tree-inspired installations made by local artists, sprawling greenery, exposed concrete and bright colors and patterns.

New York food hall Urbanspace will open two Chicago locations, the city’s first new food hall since the pandemic. Urbanspace West Washington recently opened while a second 12,000 square foot location, inside Willis Tower, is projected to open in Winter 2022. 

This spring, Chicago’s youngest Michelin-starred chef, Donald Young (Temporis, Les Nomades, Bistrot Saveurs) debuted  Venteux, a lively French brasserie featuring a swanky oyster and Champagne bar located in the new Pendry Chicago. As Executive Chef-Partner, Young opened the high-energy brasserie in partnership with acclaimed national entertainment maverick and restaurant operator, Clique Hospitality (Pendry Hotels & Resorts, MGM Resorts International, Blackstone Group). Located at 230 North Michigan Avenue within the city’s historic 1920s art deco landmark Carbide & Carbon Building, Venteux commissioned world-renowned design firm Studio Munge to create a luxurious ambiance that invites guests in to get wrapped up in comforting French fare imbued with Young’s signature creativity.

Cover photo courtesy Christopher|F Photography featured on Choose Chicago.

THE 2022 JAMES BEARD AWARD RESTAURANT AND CHEF SEMIFINALISTS

The James Beard Award Semifinalists today announced their 2022 Restaurant and Chef Awards semifinalists in advance of the returning James Beard Awards® presented by Capital One. Winners will be celebrated at the James Beard Restaurant and Chef Awards ceremony on Monday, June 13, 2022, at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. Restaurant and Chef Awards nominees, in addition to honorees for Leadership, Lifetime Achievement Award, and Humanitarian of the Year Awards will be revealed on Wednesday, March 16, 2022, in Scottsdale, AZ. Nominees for the James Beard Foundation Media Awards will be released on Wednesday, April 27, 2022, in New York City.

Mabel Gray

The James Beard Foundation’s Restaurant and Chef Awards were established in 1991 and is one of five separate recognition programs of the Awards. James Beard Awards policies and procedures can be viewed at jamesbeard.org/awards/policies

Check out the 2022 Restaurant and Chef Award semifinalists below.

Outstanding Restaurateur  

  • Ashok Bajaj, Knightsbridge Restaurant Group (Rasika, Bindaas, Annabelle, and others), Washington, D.C. 
  • Kim Bartmann, Bartmann Group, Minneapolis 
  • Chris Bianco, Tratto, Pane Bianco, and Pizzeria Bianco, Phoenix 
  • Jason and Sue Chin, Good Salt Restaurant Group, Orlando, FL 
  • Brandon Chrostowski, EDWINS Leadership and Restaurant Institute, Cleveland 
  • Larry and Jessica Delgado, Delgado Collective, McAllen, TX 
  • Ravi DeRossi, Overthrow Hospitality, NYC 
  • Greg Dulan, Dulan’s Soul Food Restaurant, Los Angeles 
  • Kevin Gillespie, Red Beard Restaurants (Gunshow, Ole Reliable, and Revival), Atlanta 
  • Andrew Le, The Pig and the Lady and Piggy Smalls, Honolulu 
  • Marc Meyer, Vicki Freeman, and Chris Paraskevaides, Bowery Group (Shuka, Shukette, Vic’s, and others) NYC 
  • Joe Muench, Black Shoe Hospitality, Milwaukee 
  • Willy Ng, Koi Palace, Dragon Beaux, and Palette Tea House, San Francisco 
  • Akkapong “Earl” Ninsom, Langbaan, Hat Yai, Eem, and others, Portland, OR 
  • Todd Richards and Joshua Lee, The Soulful Company (Lake & Oak), Atlanta 
  • J.D. Simpson and Roger Yopp, SavannahBlue, Detroit 
  • Deborah Snow and Barbara White, Blue Heron Restaurant & Catering, Sunderland, MA 
  • Chris Williams, Lucille’s Hospitality Group, Houston 
  • Ellen Yin, High Street Hospitality Group (Fork, a.kitchen + bar, High Street Philly, and others), Philadelphia 
  • Edwin Zoe, Zoe Ma Ma and Chimera Ramen, Boulder and Denver, CO 

Outstanding Chef  

  • Reem Assil, Reem’s, Oakland and San Francisco, CA 
  • Mashama Bailey, The Grey, Savannah, GA 
  • Andrew Black, Grey Sweater, Oklahoma City 
  • Peter Chang, Peter Chang, VA and MD 
  • Austin Covert, Rosewild, Fargo, ND 
  • Christopher Gross, Christopher’s, Phoenix 
  • Stephen Jones, The Larder + The Delta, Phoenix 
  • Ji Hye Kim, Miss Kim, Ann Arbor, MI 
  • Kyle Knall, Birch, Milwaukee 
  • Emiliano Marentes, ELEMI, El Paso, TX 
  • Niki Nakayama, n/naka, Los Angeles 
  • Keiji Nakazawa, Sushi Sho, Honolulu 
  • Josh Niernberg, Bin 707 Foodbar, Grand Junction, CO 
  • Alex Raij and Eder Montero, La Vara, NYC 
  • Angie Rito and Scott Tacinelli, Don Angie, NYC 
  • Michael Schwartz, Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink, Miami 
  • Douglass Williams, MIDA, Boston 
  • Cindy Wolf, Charleston, Baltimore 
  • Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi, Joule, Seattle 

 Outstanding Restaurant 

Parachute
  • Brennan’s, New Orleans 
  • Butcher & Bee, Charleston, SC 
  • Chai Pani, Asheville, NC 
  • Cora Cora, West Hartford, CT 
  • Di Fara Pizza, NYC 
  • El Burén de Lula, Loíza, PR 
  • Friday Saturday Sunday, Philadelphia 
  • Hell’s Backbone Grill & Farm, Boulder, UT 
  • La Morada, NYC 
  • Living Kitchen Farm & Dairy, Depew, OK 
  • Métier, Washington, D.C. 
  • Mixtli, San Antonio, TX 
  • Parachute, Chicago 
  • Paragary’s, Sacramento, CA 
  • Post & Beam, Los Angeles 
  • Odd Duck, Milwaukee 
  • Oriole, Chicago 
  • ShinBay, Scottsdale, AZ 
  • Sushi Izakaya Gaku, Honolulu 
  • The Walrus and the Carpenter, Seattle 

 

Emerging Chef

  • Manuel “Manny” Barella, Bellota, Denver 
  • Angel Barreto, Anju, Washington, D.C. 
  • Kristi Brown, Communion, Seattle 
  • Rochelle Daniel, Atria, Flagstaff, AZ 
  • Calvin Eng, Bonnie’s, NYC 
  • Casey Felton, Bahn Oui, Los Angeles 
  • Shenarri Freeman, Cadence, NYC 
  • Ben Grupe, Tempus, St. Louis 
  • Donald Hawk, Valentine, Phoenix 
  • Cleophus Hethington, Benne on Eagle, Asheville, NC 
  • Brian Hirata, Na‘’au, Hilo, HI 
  • Serigne Mbaye, Dakar Nola, New Orleans 
  • Thuy Pham, Mama Đút, Portland, OR 
  • Mia Orino and Carlo Gan, Kamayan ATL, Atlanta 
  • Edgar Rico, Nixta Taqueria, Austin 
  • Amanda Shulman, Her Place Supper Club, Philadelphia 
  • Amanda Turner, Olamaie, Austin 
  • Chris Viaud, Greenleaf, Milford, NH 
  • Crystal Wahpepah, Wahpepah’s Kitchen, Oakland, CA 
  • David Yoshimura, Nisei, San Francisco 

Best New Restaurant 

Café Mamajuana, Burlington, VT 
  • ABACÁ, San Francisco 
  • Angry Egret Dinette, Los Angeles 
  • Bacanora, Phoenix 
  • BARDA, Detroit 
  • Café Mamajuana, Burlington, VT 
  • Casian Seafood, Lafayette, CO 
  • Dhamaka, NYC 
  • Fritai, New Orleans 
  • Gage & Tollner, NYC 
  • Horn BBQ, Oakland, CA 
  • Kasama, Chicago 
  • Kimika, NYC 
  • Laser Wolf, Philadelphia 
  • Leeward, Portland, ME 
  • Lengua Madre, New Orleans 
  • MACHETE, Greensboro, NC 
  • Matia Kitchen & Bar, Orcas Island, WA 
  • The Marble Table, Billings, MT 
  • Nani’s Piri Piri Chicken, Asheville, NC 
  • NiHao, Baltimore 
  • Owamni, Minneapolis 
  • Oyster Oyster, Washington, D.C. 
  • Pier 6 Seafood & Oyster House, San Leon, TX 
  • República, Portland, OR 
  • Roots Southern Table, Farmers Branch, TX 
  • Sooper Secret Izakaya, Honolulu 
  • Union Hmong Kitchen, Minneapolis 
  • Ursula, NYC 
  • Zacatlán Restaurant, Santa Fe 
  • Zitz Sum, Coral Gables, FL 

Outstanding Pastry Chef 

Chacónne Patisserie
  • Antonio Bachour, Bachour, Coral Gables and Doral, FL 
  • Nicolas Blouin, Destination Kohler, Kohler, WI 
  • Warda Bouguettaya, Warda Pâtisserie, Detroit 
  • Mark Chacón, Chacónne Patisserie, Phoenix 
  • Angela Cicala, Cicala at the Divine Lorraine, Philadelphia 
  • Kate Fisher Hamm, Leeward, Portland, ME 
  • Michelle Karr-Ueoka, MW Restaurant, Honolulu 
  • Margarita Manzke, République, Los Angeles 
  • Claudia Martinez, Miller Union, Atlanta 
  • Elise Mensing, Brasserie by Niche, St. Louis 
  • Camari Mick, The Musket Room, NYC 
  • Ruben Ortega, Xochi, Houston 
  • Shannah Primiano, Porto, Chicago 
  • Rabii Saber, Four Seasons, Orlando, FL 
  • Caroline Schiff, Gage & Tollner, NYC  
  • Anne Specker, Kinship, Washington, D.C. 
  • Krystle Swenson, The Social Haus, Greenough, MT 
  • Sofia Tejeda, Mixtli, San Antonio, TX 
  • Jen Yee, Hopkins and Company, Atlanta 

Outstanding Baker 

  • David Cáceres, La Panadería, San Antonio, TX 
  • Maya-Camille Broussard, Justice of the Pies, Chicago 
  • Atsuko Fujimoto, Norimoto Bakery, Portland, ME 
  • Susannah Gebhart, Old World Levain (OWL) Bakery, Asheville, NC 
  • Marissa and Mark Gencarelli, Yoli Tortilleria, Kansas City, MO 
  • Joseph, Archalous, and Caroline Geragosian, Old Sasoon Bakery, Pasadena, CA 
  • Don Guerra, Barrio Bread, Tucson, AZ 
  • Aaron Hall, The Local Crumb, Mount Vernon, IA 
  • Mike Hirao, Nisshodo Candy Store, Honolulu 
  • Clement Hsu, Katherine Campecino-Wong, and James Wong, Breadbelly, San Francisco 
  • Nobutoshi “Nobu” Mizushima and Yuko Kawashiwo, Ihatov Bread and Coffee, Albuquerque, NM 
  • Evette Rahman, Sister Honey’s, Orlando, FL 
  • Rhonda Saltzman and Mercedes Brooks, Second Daughter Baking Co., Philadelphia 
  • Caroline Schweitzer and Lauren Heemstra, Wild Crumb, Bozeman, MT 
  • Khatera Shams, Sunshine Spice Bakery & Cafe, Boise, ID 
  • Zak Stern, Zak the Baker, Miami 
  • Elaine Townsend, Café Mochiko, Cincinnati, OH 
  • Maricsa Trejo, La Casita Bakeshop, Richardson, TX 
  • Louis Volle, Lodi, NYC 
  • Pamela Vuong, The Flour Box, Seattle 

Outstanding Hospitality (Presented by American Airlines)

  • BaoBao Dumpling House, Portland, ME 
  • Bar del Corso, Seattle 
  • Binkley’s, Phoenix 
  • Coquine, Portland, OR 
  • Cúrate, Asheville, NC 
  • House of Prime Rib, San Francisco 
  • Hugo’s, Houston 
  • Johnny’s Restaurant, Homewood, AL 
  • José, Dallas 
  • Lil’ Deb’s Oasis, Hudson, NY 
  • Mudgie’s Deli and Wine Shop, Detroit 
  • Phoenicia, Birmingham, MI 
  • The Preacher’s Son, Bentonville, AR 
  • Sanford, Milwaukee 
  • Spuntino, Denver 
  • Steve and Cookie’s, Margate, NJ 
  • Sylvia’s Restaurant, NYC 
  • Ticonderoga Club, Atlanta 
  • Tutka Bay Lodge, Homer, AK 
  • Valter’s Osteria, Salt Lake City 

 

Outstanding Wine Program

Kai
  • a.kitchen + bar, Philadelphia 
  • The Four Horsemen, NYC 
  • Frenchette, NYC 
  • Golden Age Wine, Mountain Brook, AL 
  • High Street Wine Co., San Antonio, TX 
  • Hiyu Wine Farm, Hood River, OR 
  • Kai, Phoenix 
  • L’Etoile, Madison, WI 
  • The Little Nell, Aspen, CO 
  • Lucky Palace, Bossier City, LA 
  • Lyla Lila, Atlanta 
  • Madam, Birmingham, MI 
  • Maydan, Washington, D.C. 
  • Polo Grill, Tulsa, OK 
  • The Punchdown, Oakland, CA 
  • Rainbow Ranch Lodge, Gallatin Gateway, MT 
  • Rebel Rebel, Somerville, MA 
  • Sachet, Dallas 
  • Tomo, Seattle 
  • Vicia, St. Louis 

Outstanding Bar Program

Nobody’s Darling

  • Alley Twenty Six, Durham, NC 
  • Attaboy, Nashville 
  • Avenue Pub, New Orleans 
  • Bar Leather Apron, Honolulu 
  • barmini by José Andrés, Washington, D.C. 
  • Cafe La Trova, Miami 
  • Chapel Tavern, Reno, NV 
  • Friends and Family, Oakland, CA 
  • Genever, Los Angeles 
  • Goodkind, Milwaukee 
  • The Jewel Box, Portland, ME 
  • Julep, Houston 
  • La Factoría, San Juan, PR 
  • Las Almas Rotas, Dallas 
  • Llama San, NYC 
  • Nobody’s Darling, Chicago 
  • Shelby, Detroit 
  • Valkyrie, Tulsa, OK 
  • Vicia, St. Louis 
  • Water Witch, Salt Lake City

Best Chefs (Presented by Capital One):

Best Chef: California 

Mr. Jui’s

  • Chris Barnum-Dann, Localis, Sacramento, CA 
  • Sylvan Mishima Brackett, Rintaro, San Francisco 
  • Val M. Cantu, Californios, San Francisco 
  • Keith Corbin, Alta Adams, Los Angeles 
  • Srijith Gopinathan, Ettan, Palo Alto, CA 
  • Tony Ho, Sea Harbour Seafood Restaurant, Rosemead, CA 
  • Judept Irra, Tamales Elena y Antojitos, Bell Gardens, CA 
  • Nobody’s Darling, Chicago San Francisco 
  • Matthew Kammerer, The Harbor House Inn, Elk, CA 
  • Bryant Ng, Cassia, Santa Monica, CA 
  • Heena Patel, Besharam, San Francisco 
  • Natalia Pereira, Woodspoon, Los Angeles 
  • Melissa Perello, Octavia, San Francisco 
  • Minh Phan, Phenakite, Los Angeles 
  • Justin Pichetrungsi, Anajak Thai, Los Angeles 
  • Carlos Salgado, Taco María, Costa Mesa, CA 
  • Sarintip “Jazz” Singsanong, Jitlada, Los Angeles 
  • James Syhabout, Commis, Oakland, CA 
  • Pim Techamuanvivit, Nari, San Francisco 
  • Anthony Wells, Juniper and Ivy, San Diego

Best Chef: Great Lakes (IL, IN, MI, OH) 

  • Omar Anani, Saffron De Twah, Detroit 
  • Rodolfo Cuadros, Amaru and Bloom Plant Based Kitchen, Chicago 
  • Diana Dávila Boldin, Mi Tocaya Antojería, Chicago 
  • Paul Fehribach, Big Jones, Chicago 
  • Jason Hammel, Lula Cafe, Chicago 
  • Anthony Lombardo, SheWolf, Detroit 
  • Hamissi Mamba and Nadia Nijimbere, Baobab Fare, Detroit 
  • Thomas Melvin, Vida, Indianapolis 
  • Dave Park, Jeong, Chicago 
  • Michael Ransom, ima, Detroit 
  • Darnell Reed, Luella’s Southern Kitchen, Chicago 
  • James Rigato, Mabel Gray, Hazel Park, MI 
  • Jose Salazar, Salazar, Cincinnati, OH 
  • Noah Sandoval, Oriole, Chicago 
  • Ahmad Sanji, AlTayeb, Dearborn, MI 
  • John Shields and Karen Urie Shields, Smyth, Chicago 
  • Jill Vedaa, Salt+, Lakewood, OH 
  • Sarah Welch, Marrow, Detroit 
  • Erick Williams, Virtue Restaurant & Bar, Chicago 
  • Kate Williams, Karl’s, Detroit 

  

Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA)

  • Anthony Andiario, Andiario, West Chester, PA 
  • Joey Baldino, Zeppoli, Collingswood, NJ 
  • Angel Barreto, Anju, Washington, D.C. 
  • Amy Brandwein, Centrolina, Washington, D.C. 
  • Adam Diltz, Elwood, Philadelphia 
  • Antimo DiMeo, Bardea Food & Drink, Wilmington, DE 
  • Melissa Hamilton and Christopher Hirsheimer, Canal House Station, Milford, NJ 
  • Matt Hill, Ruthie’s All-Day, Arlington, VA 
  • Bill Hoffman, The House of William & Merry, Hockessin, DE 
  • Jesse Ito, Royal Izakaya, Philadelphia 
  • Kate Lasky and Tomasz Skowronski, Apteka, Pittsburgh 
  • Wei Lu, China Chalet, Florham Park, NJ 
  • Cristina Martinez, South Philly Barbacoa, Philadelphia 
  • Peter Prime, Cane, Washington, D.C. 
  • Carlos Raba, Clavel Mezcaleria, Baltimore 
  • Michael Rafidi, Albi, Washington, D.C. 
  • Chutatip “Nok” Suntaranon, Kalaya Thai Kitchen, Philadelphia 
  • Yuan Tang, Rooster & Owl, Washington, D.C. 
  • Wei Zhu, Chengdu Gourmet, Pittsburgh 
  • Bethany Zozula, 40 North at Alphabet City, Pittsburgh 

Best Chef: Midwest (IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, ND, SD, WI)  

  • Dane Baldwin, The Diplomat, Milwaukee 
  • Karen Bell, Bavette La Boucherie, Milwaukee 
  • Daniel Bonanno, A Pig in a Fur Coat, Madison, WI 
  • Rob Connoley, Bulrush, St. Louis 
  • Jorge Guzmán, Petite León, Minneapolis 
  • Michael Haskett, M.B. Haskett Delicatessen, Sioux Falls, SD 
  • Dan Jacobs and Dan Van Rite, EsterEv, Milwaukee 
  • Mary Kastman, Driftless Cafe, Viroqua, WI 
  • Anthony Kueper, Dolce, Omaha, NE 
  • Gregory León, Amilinda, Milwaukee 
  • Rachel McGill, DISH Restaurant, Lincoln, NE 
  • Ryan Nitschke, Luna Fargo, Fargo, ND 
  • Craig Rivard, Little Fox, St. Louis 
  • Kevin Scharpf, Brazen Open Kitchen | Bar, Dubuque, IA 
  • Sean Sherman, Owamni, Minneapolis 
  • Erik Skaar, Vann, Spring Park, MN 
  • Evy Swoboda, Brasserie by Niche, St. Louis 
  • Carl Thorne-Thomsen, Story., Prairie Village, KS 
  • Yia Vang, Union Hmong Kitchen, Minneapolis 
  • Ben Welch, Botanica, Wildwood, MO 

Best Chef: Mountain (CO, ID, MT, UT, WY) 

  • Saibeen Acord, Saibeen’s Kitchen, Great Falls, MT 
  • Salvador Alamilla, Amano, Caldwell, ID 
  • Dan Ansotegui, Ansots, Boise, ID 
  • Jose Avila, El Borrego Negro, Denver 
  • Mike Blocher, Nick Fahs, and David Barboza, Table X, Salt Lake City 
  • Cody Cheetham, Tavernetta, Denver 
  • Logen Crew and Paul Chamberlain, SLC Eatery, Salt Lake City 
  • Caroline Glover, Annette, Aurora, CO 
  • Briar Handly, Handle, Park City, UT 
  • Suchada Johnson, Teton Thai, Teton Village, WY 
  • Kris Komori, KIN, Boise, ID 
  • Chris Lockhart, PREROGATIvE Kitchen, Red Lodge, MT 
  • Chris McDonald, Cowfish, Lander, WY 
  • Mawa McQueen, Mawa’s Kitchen, Aspen, CO 
  • Brian Menges, The 2nd Street Bistro, Livingston, MT 
  • Paul Naugle, Izakaya Three Fish, Bozeman, MT 
  • Dana Rodriguez, Work & Class, Denver 
  • Eric Skokan, Black Cat Farm Table Bistro, Boulder, CO 
  • Luis Young, Penrose Room, Colorado Springs, CO 
  • Dave Wells, The Tasting Room at Chico Hot Springs Resort & Day Spa, Pray, MT 

Best Chef: New York State  

Under the Volcano
  • Einat Admony, Balaboosta, NYC 
  • Mary Attea, The Musket Room, NYC 
  • Albert and Malenda Bartley, Top Taste, Kingston, NY 
  • Amanda Cohen, Dirt Candy, NYC 
  • Nick Curtola, The Four Horsemen, NYC  
  • Eric Gao, O Mandarin, Hartsdale and Hicksville, NY 
  • JJ Johnson, FIELDTRIP, NYC 
  • Gabe McMackin, Troutbeck, Amenia, NY 
  • Helen Nguyen, Saigon Social, NYC 
  • Ayesha Nurdjaja, Shuka, NYC 
  • Chintan Pandya, Dhamaka, NYC 
  • Kyo Pang, Kopitiam, NYC 
  • Junghyun Park, Atomix, NYC 
  • Carla Perez-Gallardo and Hannah Black, Lil’ Deb’s Oasis, Hudson, NY 
  • Erik Ramirez, Llama Inn, NYC 
  • Romeo Regalli, Ras Plant Based, NYC 
  • Irwin Sánchez, Under the Volcano, NYC 
  • Bryce Shuman, Sweetbriar, NYC 
  • Hillary Sterling, Ci Siamo, NYC 
  • Dale Talde, Goosefeather, Tarrytown, NY 

Best Chef: Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) 

Annette

  • Bowman Brown, Elda, Biddeford, ME 
  • Vien Dobui, CÔNG TỬ BỘT, Portland, ME 
  • Patricia Estorino, Gustazo Cuban Kitchen & Bar, Waltham and Cambridge, MA 
  • Tiffani Faison, Orfano, Boston 
  • Jeff Fournier, Thompson House Eatery, Jackson, NH 
  • Daniel Gursha, Ledger, Salem, MA 
  • Tico Huynh, Yvonne’s, Cambridge, MA 
  • Ben Jackson, Magnus on Water, Biddeford, ME 
  • Jeremy Kean and Philip Kruta, Brassica Kitchen + Cafe, Boston 
  • Christian Kruse, Black Flannel Brewing Company, Essex Junction, VT 
  • Brian Lewis, The Cottage, Westport, CT 
  • Courtney Loreg, Woodford Food and Beverage, Portland, ME 
  • Macarena Ludena, Cora Cora, West Hartford, CT 
  • Nisachon Morgan, Saap, Randolph, VT 
  • Cassie Piuma, Sarma, Somerville, MA 
  • William Rietzel, COAST, Watch Hill, RI 
  • Damian Sansonetti, Chaval, Portland, ME 
  • John DaSilva, Chickadee, Boston 
  • David Schrier, Jessica Pollard and David Clegg, Daily Operation, Easthampton, MA 
  • David Vargas, Vida Cantina, Portsmouth, NH

Best Chef: Northwest and Pacific (AK, HI, OR, WA)  

  • Nathan Bentley, Altura Bistro, Anchorage, AK 
  • Nick Coffey, Ursa Minor, Lopez Island, WA 
  • Erasto Jackson, Lil Red’s Takeout and Catering, Seattle 
  • Jonathan Jones, Epilogue Kitchen & Cocktails, Salem, OR 
  • Liz Kenyon, Rupee Bar, Seattle 
  • Carlo Lamagna, Magna Kusina, Portland, OR 
  • Robynne Maii, Fête, Honolulu 
  • Melissa Miranda, Musang, Seattle 
  • David Nichols, Eight Row, Seattle 
  • Vince Nguyen, Berlu, Portland, OR 
  • Brandon Pettit, Delancey, Seattle 
  • Thomas Pisha-Duffly, Oma’s Hideaway, Portland, OR 
  • Mark Pomaski, Moon & Turtle, Hilo, HI 
  • Beau Schooler, In Bocca Al Lupo, Juneau, AK 
  • Sheldon Simeon, Tin Roof, Kahului, HI 
  • Mutsuko Soma, Kamonegi, Seattle 
  • Robert Urquidi, Ethel’s Grill, Honolulu 
  • Jojo Vasquez, Fond, Lahaina, HI 
  • Aaron Verzosa, Archipelago, Seattle 
  • Chad White, Zona Blanca, Spokane, WA 

Best Chef: Southeast (GA, KY, NC, SC, TN, WV) 

Curate
  • Katie Button, Cúrate, Asheville, NC 
  • Greg Collier, Leah & Louise, Charlotte, NC 
  • Mike Costello and Amy Dawson, Lost Creek Farm, Lost Creek, WV 
  • Oscar Diaz, The Cortez, Raleigh, NC 
  • Sunny Gerhart, St. Roch Fine Oysters + Bar, Raleigh, NC 
  • Jake Howell, Peninsula, Nashville 
  • Philip Krajeck, Rolf and Daughters, Nashville 
  • Cheetie Kumar, Garland, Raleigh, NC 
  • Anthony Lamas, Seviche, Louisville, KY 
  • Jason Liang, Brush Sushi Izakaya, Decatur, GA 
  • Ouita Michel, Holly Hill Inn, Midway, Lexington, and Versailles, KY 
  • Ricky Moore, SALTBOX Seafood Joint, Durham, NC 
  • Orlando Pagán, Wild Common, Charleston, SC 
  • Craig Richards, Lyla Lila, Atlanta 
  • Alison Settle, Barn8, Goshen, KY 
  • Peyton Smith, Mission Pizza Napoletana, Winston-Salem, NC 
  • Stephanie Tyson, Sweet Potatoes, Winston-Salem, NC 
  • Aaron Vandemark, Panciuto, Hillsborough, NC 
  • Joey Ward, Southern Belle and Georgia Boy, Atlanta 
  • Mailea Weger, Lou, Nashville 

Best Chef: South (AL, AR, FL, LA, MS, PR)  

  • Blake Aguillard and Trey Smith, Saint-Germain, New Orleans 
  • Michael Beltran, Ariete, Coconut Grove, FL 
  • Valerie, Nando, and Fernando Chang, Itamae, Miami 
  • Clay Conley, Buccan, Palm Beach, FL 
  • Adam Evans, Automatic Seafood and Oysters, Birmingham, AL 
  • Jeremy Ford, Stubborn Seed, Miami 
  • Hao Gong, LUVI Restaurant, New Orleans 
  • Francis Guzmán, Vianda, San Juan, PR 
  • Timothy Hontzas, Johnny’s Restaurant, Homewood, AL 
  • Melissa M. Martin, Mosquito Supper Club, New Orleans 
  • Matthew McClure, The Hive, Bentonville, AR 
  • Abel Mendoza, Estela, Rincón, PR 
  • Henry Moso, Kabooki Sushi, Orlando, FL 
  • Michael Nelson, GW Fins, New Orleans 
  • Niven Patel, Ghee Indian Kitchen, Kendall, FL 
  • Alex Perry, Vestige, Ocean Springs, MS 
  • Michael Pirolo, Macchialina, Miami 
  • Allison Richard, High Hat Cafe, New Orleans 
  • Rafael Rios, Yeyo’s, Bentonville, AR 
  • Isaac Toups, Toups’ Meatery, New Orleans 

Best Chef: Southwest (AZ, NM, NV, OK)  

  • Matthew Amberg, Oren, Tulsa, OK 
  • Wanda J. Armstrong, Evelyn’s, Tulsa, OK 
  • Indri Bahar, Rendang & Co. Indonesian Bistro, Tulsa, OK 
  • Troy Cannan, LuLou’s Restaurant, Reno, NV 
  • Kwok Chen, Kwok’s Bistro, Reno, NV 
  • Andrew Donovan, Basque, Tulsa, OK 
  • Lori Hashimoto, Hana Japanese Eatery, Phoenix 
  • Zach Hutton, Scratch Kitchen & Cocktails, Oklahoma City, OK 
  • Gina Marinelli, La Strega and Harlo, Las Vegas 
  • John Martinez, Tito & Pep, Tucson, AZ 
  • Maria Mazon, BOCA Tacos y Tequila, Tuscon, AZ 
  • Ahmed Obo, Jambo Cafe, Santa Fe 
  • Fernando Olea, Sazón, Santa Fe 
  • Martín Rios, Restaurant Martín, Santa Fe 
  • Salazar Brothers, La Guelaguetza, Albuquerque, NM 
  • Giovanni Scorzo, Andreoli Italian Grocer, Scottsdale, AZ 
  • Eben Shillingford, Sisserou’s, Tulsa, OK 
  • Jamie Tran, The Black Sheep, Las Vegas 
  • Hongrui Xin, Big Dan Shanxi Taste, Las Vegas 
  • Marie Yniguez, Bocadillos, Albuquerque, NM 

Best Chef: Texas 

Cured
  • Alex Au-Yeung, Phat Eatery, Katy, TX 
  • Damien Brockway, Distant Relatives, Austin 
  • Aaron Bludorn, Bludorn, Houston 
  • Sylvia Casares, Sylvia’s Enchilada Kitchen, Houston 
  • Tiffany Derry, Roots Southern Table, Farmers Branch, TX 
  • Christine Ha and Tony J. Nguyen, Xin Chào, Houston 
  • Quy Hoang, Blood Bros. BBQ, Bellaire, TX 
  • Kaiser Lashkari, Himalaya Restaurant, Houston 
  • Matt McCallister, Homewood, Dallas 
  • Steven McHugh, Cured, San Antonio, TX 
  • Misti Norris, Petra & the Beast, Dallas 
  • Anastacia Quiñones-Pittman, José, Dallas 
  • Esaul Ramos Jr., 2M Smokehouse, San Antonio, TX 
  • Felipe Riccio, MARCH, Houston 
  • Regino Rojas, Revolver Taco Lounge, Dallas 
  • John Russ, Clementine, San Antonio, TX 
  • Ernest Servantes and David Kirkland, Burnt Bean Co., Seguin, TX 
  • Iliana de la Vega, El Naranjo, Austin 
  • Finn Walter, The Nicolett, Lubbock, TX 
  • Koji Yoshida, EBESU Robata & Sushi, Plano, TX 

Oscar of the Food World: Florence’s Restaurant in NE OKC wins prestigious James Beard Foundation Award! From KOCO Oklahoma City

KOCO Oklahoma City: Oscar of the food world: Florence’s Restaurant in NE OKC wins prestigious James Beard Foundation Award. https://www.koco.com/article/oklahoma-florence-restaurant-james-beard-award/39126571