Detroit-style Pizza Hits the Streets of San Francisco with the Opening of Joyride Pizza

Samovar Tea business partners and brothers Jesse Jacobs and Joshua Jacobs have officially launched  Joyride Pizza now open at two prime San Francisco locations–Yerba Buena Gardens (730 Howard Street) and Joyride Valencia at 411 Valencia Street. The locations of Joyride Pizza, a new classic Detroit-style pizza, transforms architecturally stunning spaces into a mecca for Detroit pizza. Yerba Buena, with its floor-to-ceiling windows captures the San Francisco cityscape and offers gorgeous outdoor dining capable to seating 49 seats along with complete access to the gardens for those ordering to-go. The Valencia Street spot celebrates the poured concrete and limestone aesthetic on this popular urban thoroughfare.

The brothers bring the same commitment to creating a fantastic culinary experience as they did with Samovar Tea. When it comes to Detroit pizza, visitors at Joyride can enjoy such creations as  frico–pizza with a crispy caramelized cheese topping a 48-hour fermented focaccia with Sonoma County sourced organic ingredients.


Joyride Pizza celebrates the nostalgic pull of pizza, one of America’s favorite food. The concept started during last year’s COVID-19 shelter-in-place when co-founder Jesse Jacobs started tinkering in his home kitchen by using sourdough starters for baking bread with his wife and making pizzas in their Detroit style 8×10 cooking sheet for family dinners. It connected Jacobs with memories of the first time he ate pizza in 7th grade. It was from Pino’s Pizza in Brighton, Massachusetts and the taste was vastly different than the foods of his boyhood home where foods were strictly macrobiotic and organic. Pizza, as far as his family was concerned, was the antithesis of brown rice, lentils, and seaweed.

But that didn’t prevent his first taste of pizza and its intoxicating aroma to be an ecstatic though guilty pleasure. Jesse sums up this life changing experience in one word: Joy.


“Samovar Tea was on the cusp of expansion prior to the pandemic,” says Jesse. “I spent 20 years developing Samovar into an iconic brand. Similar to other restaurateurs across the country, COVID-19 dissolved the brick-and-mortar businesses to the point of no return. We needed to creatively adapt to the moment. Homemade pizza has brought so much joy to my family over the past year that my brother and I ultimately decided to go all-in and develop the best Detroit pizza we could imagine. We’re making nutrient-rich pizzas from local farm ingredients. We couldn’t be prouder of the menu, and can’t wait for people to try it out.”


The Jacobs brothers always had a love for Italian cuisine. It was, after all, a happy alternative to macrobiotics. On the non-macrobiotic side of their family, they enjoyed homemade fresh pastas, pizzas, sauces, and meats.

Later Joshua worked as a waiter at an Italian restaurant in high school, while Jesse worked as a pasta cook, waiter, and busser at various Italian restaurants in Boston’s North End and throughout New England.

Their ambitions ultimately took Jesse to Japan and then San Francisco and Joshua into the East Coast tech scene. The pandemic caused them to reflect, asking: “How can we bring the values and principles of Samovar Tea into the comfort food space that brings people instant joy?”

The answer was Joyride Pizza.

The Jacobs brothers developed a new digital retail store for Samovar Tea in an effort for beverage aficionados to continue to purchase their premium organic teas globally (LINK). To realize their epic pizza dream, they brought in acclaimed pizzaiolo Alastair Hannmann as Culinary Advisor & Regional Operations Manager of Joyride Pizza. A close friend and former employee of 13-time World Pizza Champion, Tony Gemignani, Hannmann was the master pizza maker who helped bring the vision and operations to life. Hannmann has a world-class track record that includes running an award-winning pizza chain in Hawaii, managing production at Zume, Inc., and winning accolades from the Guinness World Records for “World’s Longest Pizza” that was 1.5 miles long.

Joyride Pizza — Sonoma County PurveyorsBased in Sonoma County, Jesse Jacobs sought out small-batch, organic purveyors in Sonoma County for as many ingredients as possible for the Joyride Pizza menu. Petaluma’s hand-selected grains from Central Milling became a staple of the focaccia dough allowing for a sophisticated level of craftsmanship to carry on the Bay Area tradition of artisanal bread baking. Grown in California’s Central Valley, the newly planted organic wheat strain Yecora Rojo is custom blended for Joyride Pizza and the perfect varietal for a two-day fermentation. Higher proteins in the wheat offer greater strength in the dough for longer fermentation and bubbly, delicate, and delicious dough with naturally sweet and malty notes.


Artisan cured meats are from Zoe’s Meats in Petaluma including nitrate-free pepperoni, chicken, charcuterie, and wild oregano. Sonoma County Meat Company supplies all-beef meatballs, Italian sausage, and Applewood smoked bacon. Gourmet Mushroom Company sustainably grows Mycopia mushrooms in Sebastopol and Joyride Pizza utilizes the seasonal Chef’s Blend. Double 8 Dairy hand delivers ricotta cheese to Joyride Pizza, and Sonoma Vinegar and Sonoma Salt Company also provide essential products.
In Lodi, Joyride Pizza sources Corto Olive Oil for the focaccia dough, sauces, and finishing oil. Tomatoes are from Stanislaus Tomato Company in Modesto, Calif. Authentic to Detroit pizza is Brick Cheese, which is brought in along with mozzarella cheese from Buholzer Brothers in Wisconsin.


Joyride Pizza — Yerba Buena Gardens & Valencia Menus

Joyride Pizza – Yerba Buena Gardens sits atop one of San Francisco’s glorious outdoor green spaces. Joyride Pizza offers indoor dining as well as 49 seats of awe-inspiring views outside on its promenade. To-go orders can be enjoyed in the gardens below. Joyride Pizza – Yerba Buena Gardens serves six Classic Detroit Pizzas including The Cheese, Zoe ‘Roni Pepperoni, Meatzza, Pestoriffic, Sweet Heat Pineapple, and Eat Your Veggies (as well as Build Your Own). The menu features handcrafted Housemade Fresh Pastas (Red Sauce, Fusilli Pesto, Chiocciole Bolognese, Bucatini Carbonara, Kid’s Pasta); Salads (Spare Parts Chop, A Date With A Nut, Caesar with Anchovy Chimichurri, Mixed Baby Greens); Hand-Carved Charcuterie with a selection of locally cured meats, cheeses, and olives; and Desserts (Four Barrel Coffee Affogato, Gelato – 5 Different Flavors, Cannoli with rainbow sprinkles, pistachios, or chocolate chips, Vanilla Cheesecake, and a Root Beer Float).


Doug Dalton and Brian Sheehy (Co-Owners, Future Bars Group) supported the craft cocktail menu design along with Fred Acebo and Dan Sheel at Joyride Pizza – Yerba Buena Gardens featuring classics such as the Old Fashioned Joyride, Negroni, Bijou, Pineapple Smash, Pizza-Bloody Mary, and Bellini ($12/cocktail or $60/carafe). A selection of whiskey and amaro is available (2 oz. pours). Small-production California coast wines are on the menu from wineries such as Una Lou (Sonoma, CA), Pence Vineyards (Santa Rita, CA), Carignan (Mendocino, CA), Gail Wine (Sonoma, CA). Craft beers are from Fort Point and Temescal Brewing; other drinks include Golden State Cider and JuneShine Hard Kombucha. Non-alcoholic drinks include Samovar Organic Tea (Black, Green, Herbal), Four Barrel French Press Coffee, and a variety of sodas.


The Joyride Pizza – Valencia menu includes six Classic Detroit Pizzas (The Cheese, Zoe ‘Roni Pepperoni, Meatzza, Pestoriffic, Sweet Heat Pineapple, Eat Your Veggies as well as a Build Your Own); Salads (Spare Parts Chop, Caesar with Anchovy Chimichurri); Sweets (Cheesecake); Sides (Mike’s Hot Honey Packet, Marinara Sauce, Homemade Ranch), and Sodas.

Pizza: History, recipes, stories, people, places, love

Nutella Ring from Pizza

Thom and James Elliott have curated Pizza, an amazing book that’s totally about pizza from recipes for such stunning varieties like Mortadella & Pistachio pie to city guides on where to get the best pizza when in Rome, Naples, Paris, and Chicago as well as a chapter on great pizza pop cultural moments. And that’s just for starters. You don’t have to be a pizza pie devotee to enjoy the recipes, stories, and journeys he takes on.

James and his brother Thom are known as the Pizza Pilgrims duo, took a look at all things pizza throughout the world and put it together in this lavish cookbook. To do their due diligence, they ditched their jobs in 2012 to go on a life-changing pilgrimage to Naples, the home of pizza, to earn how it’s done from the source. Back in the UK, they set up a market stall in Soho selling pizza from the back of their trusty Ape van. Pizza Pilgrims now run 16 pizzerias (and counting) in London and the southeast of the UK.

“Pizza is one of the most universal foods and the passion people have for it is clearly noted in pop culture across the world,” the two brothers say. “We have been working in pizza for over a decade, so we wanted to write a love letter of sorts chronicling pizza in culture, the people that make it, the styles that have been created across the globe and the love that people have for it! Everyone has a mate that loves pizza, like, REALLY loves it—this book is for them!”

Published by Hardie Grant Books, November 2020, RRP $29.99 Hardcover. it makes a good gift for the foodies in your life and a great addition to your own cookbook collection.

Thom and James Elliott

The Nutella Ring

4 ½ ounces Neapolitan pizza dough (see recipe below)

1 ½ ounces ricotta

3 ½ ounces Nutella

Sea salt

Ice cream, to serve

Preheat your oven as hot as it will go.

Using your fingertips, stretch out the dough into a long rectangle about 35cm/14in long and 12cm/5in wide.

Using a spoon, spread the ricotta over the dough lengthways in a long line. Then spoon as much Nutella as you can onto the dough in a long line down the middle of the ricotta. Sprinkle with sea salt.

Fold the dough over itself lengthways so you have a long Nutella parcel, then, using a closed fist, hammer the long edge to ensure a really strong seal on the dough.

Bring the ends of the parcel around to create a ring (with the seam on the inside) and press the two ends of dough together, using your fist again to make a strong seal.

Bake until the ring has inflated, and the crust is golden. Serve with vanilla ice cream.

Making Neapolitan Pizza Dough

Tip: Weigh out all your ingredients before you start.

35 ounces ‘00’ flour—the authors recommend Caputo ‘blue’ which can be purchased on Amazon or your can substitute semolina flour

⅔ teaspoon fresh yeast

 21 fluid ounces tepid water

1 ounce fine sea salt

Make a mountain of flour in the middle of the table. Using your fist, make a deep well in the middle of the flour, exposing the surface of the table (turning your mountain into a moon crater).

Crumble the yeast into the tepid water. Use your good hand to mash up the yeast in the water until it has dissolved. Fill your crater of flour with a third of the yeast/water mix. Using your fingertips, start making very small circular motions to combine the flour and water.

Start dragging in some more flour to the mix, by ‘undercutting’ the walls of the crater with your fingertips. As you do this the mixture in the middle will become thicker. Once it reaches the consistency of porridge you need to add a bit more water. Don’t let it get too thick; if it starts to form a dough too soon it becomes difficult to incorporate the rest of the water. Keep dragging in a little flour to thicken the mix, then pouring a little bit more water in to loosen it, until you have all the water used up.

Sprinkle the sea salt over the mixture while it’s still very wet to ensure it dissolves and disperses evenly throughout the dough. Now use both hands to push the remaining flour from the outside into the middle. Fold and press the mix until all the flour is absorbed, and a dough comes together. If you have a dough scraper it really helps get everything off the table, but you can improvise with a paint scraper, spatula, or knife.

Work the gluten by kneading the dough. Use the heel of your hand to stretch out the dough and roll it back up, while the other hand acts like an anchor. You’ll be able to see the strands of gluten stretching, breaking, being put back together, and becoming stronger. Continue this for about 8 minutes until the dough becomes smooth and glossy. It should also feel tighter and elastic.

Let the dough have a 10-minute rest to relax the gluten. Cover the dough with a damp cloth or some plastic wrap to keep the air from drying it out. Then divide your bulk of dough into individual portions. Ensure your dough balls are neatly shaped – pinched at the bottom and tight on the top – then place them in a tray or container 1-inch apart. Cover with a tight lid or plastic wrap.

Leave the dough at room temperature for approximately 6 hours until it expands to almost double its size, then store in the fridge overnight. The next day remove the dough from the fridge for 1–2 hours and bring it back to room temperature before making your pizzas.

Pumpkin, Sausage, Sage & Chili

This pizza was inspired by the first man to teach us how to make pizza – Gianluca. He was our cooking teacher when we were in Tuscany and he made a pumpkin and sausage pasta dish that we will remember for ever. We took this recipe as gospel and just transported it onto a pizza, which in our opinion sums up the taste of autumn perfectly

INGREDIENTS

1 ball of Neapolitan pizza dough 

Parmesan, for grating

1 tbsp good-quality olive oil

80g (3oz) fior di latte mozzarella, torn or sliced

60g (2oz) roasted fennel sausage, cut into bite-sized pieces

4–5 sage leaves sliced  

fresh chili, to taste

chili oil, to serve

FOR THE PUMPKIN MIXTURE

Makes enough for 4 pizzas

40g (1½oz) butter

50ml (scant ¼ cup) good-quality olive oil

2 garlic cloves, finely diced

500g (1lb 2oz) diced pumpkin (prepared weight)

salt and freshly ground black pepper

METHOD

1.For the pumpkin, heat the butter, oil and garlic in a large saucepan until the garlic is golden brown. Tip in the pumpkin and cook, stirring occasionally, on a medium heat until soft. Add salt and pepper to taste, then take off the heat and leave to cool.

2.Preheat the grill (broiler) to its absolute highest setting, and place a large, ovenproof frying pan (skillet) over a high heat and let it get screaming hot. 

3.Meanwhile, flatten and stretch the dough ball (following the instructions on page 101) to make a 10-inch pizza base.

4.Lay the pizza base flat in the hot, dry frying pan, then spread with80g (3oz) of the pumpkin mixture. Grate over some Parmesan and drizzle with the olive oil, then top with the mozzarella, sausage, sage leaves and fresh chilli.

5.Once the base of the pizza has browned, about 1–2 minutes, place the frying pan under the grill on the highest shelf. 

6.Once the crust has taken on some color, about 1–2 minutes, drizzle with chili oil. Pumpkin

Suggested credit line: Recipes excerpted with permission from PIZZA: Pizza: recipes, stories, history, places, people, love 

by Thom Elliot and James Elliot, published by Hardie Grant Books, November 2020, RRP $29.99 Hardcover.

Best Cookbooks for Last Minute Holiday Giving

The Unofficial Disney Parks Cookbook: From Delicious Dole Whip to taste Mickey Pretzels, 100 Magical Disney-Inspired Recipes.

Ashley Craft

Adams Media $14.99 Amazon price

Mickey Pretzels

Serves 4

1⁄2 cup warm water (110°F)

1 (1⁄4-ounce) envelope active dry yeast

2 tablespoons light brown sugar

1 teaspoon plus 2 tablespoons salt, divided

4 cups all-purpose flour

4 cups plus 1 tablespoon room-temperature water, divided

1⁄4 cup baking soda

1 large egg

4 teaspoons Kosher salt

‌In the bowl of a stand mixer, add warm water and sprinkle yeast on top. Let sit 10 minutes.

‌Add brown sugar and 1 teaspoon salt. Using the flat beater attachment, beat on low speed to combine. Mix in flour. Switch to dough hook attachment and knead 5 minutes. Dough should be smooth and elastic.

‌Remove dough and spray bowl with nonstick cooking spray. Return dough to bowl. Cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 450°F. Line a large ungreased baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

In a large pot over high heat, bring 4 cups water to a boil.

‌Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut dough into eight equal pieces. Working with one piece at a time, roll dough into a rough heart shape. Using a sharp knife, lightly score or scrape the Mickey shape into the dough. Once you’ve achieved your desired shape, cut all the way through the dough.

‌Add baking soda to pot of boiling water. Working with one Mickey at a time, use a big, flat spatula to carefully lift a dough Mickey into baking-soda bath, and poach 15 seconds. Remove to prepared baking sheet.

‌In a small bowl, mix together egg and remaining 1 tablespoon water. Brush onto Mickeys. Sprinkle remaining salt over pretzels.

‌Bake until deep golden brown, about 10 minutes. Serve immediately.


The Nutella Ring from Pizza: History, recipes, stories, people, places, love. Photo by Dave Brown.

Pizza: History, recipes, stories, people, places, love

Thom Elliott & James Elliott

Quadrille Publishing $29.99

An amazing book totally about pizza from recipes for such stunning varieties like Mortadella & Pistachio pie to city guides on where to get the best pizza when in Rome, Naples, Paris, and Chicago as well as a chapter on great pizza pop cultural moments. And that’s just for starters.

The Nutella Ring

4 ½ ounces Neapolitan pizza dough (see recipe below)

1 ½ ounces ricotta

3 ½ ounces Nutella

Sea salt

Ice cream, to serve

Preheat your oven as hot as it will go.

Using your fingertips, stretch out the dough into a long rectangle about 35cm/14in long and 12cm/5in wide.

Using a spoon, spread the ricotta over the dough lengthways in a long line. Then spoon as much Nutella as you can onto the dough in a long line down the middle of the ricotta. Sprinkle with sea salt.

Fold the dough over itself lengthways so you have a long Nutella parcel, then, using a closed fist, hammer the long edge to ensure a really strong seal on the dough.

Bring the ends of the parcel around to create a ring (with the seam on the inside) and press the two ends of dough together, using your fist again to make a strong seal.

Bake until the ring has inflated, and the crust is golden. Serve with vanilla ice cream.

Making Neapolitan Pizza Dough

Tip: Weigh out all your ingredients before you start.

35 ounces ‘00’ flour—the authors recommend Caputo ‘blue’ which can be purchased on Amazon or your can substitute semolina flour

⅔ teaspoon fresh yeast

 21 fluid ounces tepid water

1 ounce fine sea salt

Make a mountain of flour in the middle of the table. Using your fist, make a deep well in the middle of the flour, exposing the surface of the table (turning your mountain into a moon crater).

Crumble the yeast into the tepid water. Use your good hand to mash up the yeast in the water until it has dissolved. Fill your crater of flour with a third of the yeast/water mix. Using your fingertips, start making very small circular motions to combine the flour and water.

Start dragging in some more flour to the mix, by ‘undercutting’ the walls of the crater with your fingertips. As you do this the mixture in the middle will become thicker. Once it reaches the consistency of porridge you need to add a bit more water. Don’t let it get too thick; if it starts to form a dough too soon it becomes difficult to incorporate the rest of the water. Keep dragging in a little flour to thicken the mix, then pouring a little bit more water in to loosen it, until you have all the water used up.

Sprinkle the sea salt over the mixture while it’s still very wet to ensure it dissolves and disperses evenly throughout the dough. Now use both hands to push the remaining flour from the outside into the middle. Fold and press the mix until all the flour is absorbed, and a dough comes together. If you have a dough scraper it really helps get everything off the table, but you can improvise with a paint scraper, spatula, or knife.

Work the gluten by kneading the dough. Use the heel of your hand to stretch out the dough and roll it back up, while the other hand acts like an anchor. You’ll be able to see the strands of gluten stretching, breaking, being put back together, and becoming stronger. Continue this for about 8 minutes until the dough becomes smooth and glossy. It should also feel tighter and elastic.

Let the dough have a 10-minute rest to relax the gluten. Cover the dough with a damp cloth or some plastic wrap to keep the air from drying it out. Then divide your bulk of dough into individual portions. Ensure your dough balls are neatly shaped – pinched at the bottom and tight on the top – then place them in a tray or container 1-inch apart. Cover with a tight lid or plastic wrap.

Leave the dough at room temperature for approximately 6 hours until it expands to almost double its size, then store in the fridge overnight. The next day remove the dough from the fridge for 1–2 hours and bring it back to room temperature before making your pizzas.

Cod en Papillote with Spinach, Olives and Mediterranean Herbs

Dinner’s in the Bag: 60 Easy Oven Recipes All Wrapped Up

by Louise Kenney

Quadrille Publishing ($5.71 current Amazon price)

It doesn’t have to be a bag, you could instead use foil, baking parchment or oven-proof plastic and silicone bags, but the concept is the same with all these recipes—easy, quick, and little to clean up afterwards. Recipes include Roasted rhubarb with vanilla, orange and cinnamon and Pineapple en papillote with honey, thyme, and rum.

Cod en Papillote with Spinach, Olives and Mediterranean Herbs

Serves 2

½ cup pitted black olives

2 anchovy fillets in oil

4 thyme stalks, leaves picked

4 oregano stalks, leaves picked

1 small bunch of flat leaf parsley

1 lemon

olive oil

14-ounce can butter beans, drained and rinsed

4 ¼ ounces baby leaf spinach, washed

2 cod loins (approx. 5 ½ ounces each)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

To serve

6 radishes, sliced

a handful of pea shoots

Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Line a baking dish with a large piece of parchment or foil, or an oven bag.

Finely chop the olives, anchovy fillets and herbs together. Mix together with juice from half of the lemon in a bowl, season with salt and pepper and add a little glug of olive oil.

In a separate bowl, combine the butter beans with the spinach leaves and two-thirds of the olive and herb mixture. Drizzle in a little more olive oil and season well with salt and pepper. Tip into the lined baking dish and spread everything out evenly.

Slice the remaining lemon half into 4–6 slices and lay these on top of the spinach and beans. Place the cod loins on top of the lemon slices, season with salt and pepper and spread the remaining herby olive mixture over the fish. Close up the parcel and bake in the oven for 15–20 minutes. (If using an oven bag, snip a few slits in the top to allow steam to escape.)

When cooked, unwrap and serve with the radish slices and pea shoots scattered over the top.

Buttermilk & Bourbon: New Orleans Recipes with a Modern Flair

Jason Santos

Page Street Publishing $15.29 Amazon price

Santos, who owns a Louisiana-centric restaurant in Boston, offers up some great recipes such as Deviled Egg Toast with Country Ham and Hot Pepper Salad, Cast Iron-Baked Brie, and Flamin’ Hot Cheeto Mac & Cheese, the most popular dish at his restaurant. 

Flamin’ Hot Cheeto Mac & Cheese

Serves 4

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided

1 cup  meat scraps, diced (bacon, andouille, pork belly, ham, etc.)

½ cup  diced celery

¾ cup diced shallots

1 tablespoon  minced garlic

1 tablespoon tomato paste

1 cup white wine

2 bay leaves

1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped

8 ounces cream cheese

1 cup heavy cream

1 cup half & half

½ cup  grated Parmesan cheese

½ cup shredded fontina

½ cup shredded yellow cheddar

½ cup shredded gouda

½ pound  campanelle pasta, cooked (can substitute fusilli, penne, rigatoni, macaroni, or rotini

Salt and pepper, to taste

1 cup spicy cheese puffs (I like Flamin’ Hot Cheetos), slightly crushed

¼ cup minced chives

½ cup spicy cheese puffs, whole

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. In a heavy-bottomed pot, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter and sauté the meat scraps until lightly browned, about 3 to 5 minutes. Remove the meat, reserving the fat. Then add the celery, shallots and garlic and cook until soft, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add the tomato paste and cook for another 3 minutes to incorporate. Deglaze with the wine and reduce by half, about 10 minutes. Add the bay leaves, thyme, cream cheese, heavy cream, and half & half. Bring to a simmer for 10 minutes. Add the Parmesan, fontina, cheddar and gouda and simmer for 10 more minutes. Remove the bay leaves and puree the entire mixture with a stick blender (or in batches using a regular blender/food processor). Add the meat scraps back to the pot.

Combine the sauce with pasta and season with salt and pepper.

Divide the mixture into 4 casserole dishes. Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter and combine with the crushed Cheetos, and scatter on top of the pasta mixture. Bake for about 7 minutes or until bubbly. Garnish with chives and the whole Cheetos.

Katie Parla’s Virtual Interactive Show: Pinsa Romana with Katie Parla

Just a reminder that today,  Friday, September 25 at 12pm PT/2pm CT/3pm ET, the wonderful Katie Parla, will be doing a vitual interactive show: Pinsa Romana with Katie Parla.

Katie Parla

This is a deep diveinto Pinsa dough (one of several Roman styles of flatbreads). Katie will surely drop some amazing tips and lots of history behind her pinsa dough recipe.

The recipe she will be demonstrating is inspired by the “official” pinsa recipe, uses bread and rice flour, and has been adapted for a Breville oven (La Pratolina bakes in a wood fired oven).

Spezzatino all Uva from Katie Parla’s Foods of the Italian South (Clarkson Potter)

Katie Parla is a Rome-based food journalist, culinary guide, cookbook author, and co-host of the Gola Podcast about Italian food culture. Her forthcoming cookbook, Food of the Italian Islands, will focus on Sicily and Sardegna. She is currently working on an untitled pizza cookbook with Dan Richer of Razza in Jersey City, NJ who will be making a special appearance next Friday with Katie and Scott Wiener, a pizza expert, who runs the famous NY based Scott’s Pizza Tours

Calazzo in Southern Italy

Katie will focus on the Pinsa Romana from her book, Food of the Italian South (2019 Clarkson Potter) for this event, baking in the Breville Smart Oven Pizzaiolo. Katie is also the author of Tasting Rome: Fresh Flavors and Forgotten Recipes from an Ancient City

The recipe Katie will be demonstrating is inspired by the “official” pinsa recipe, uses bread and rice flour, and has been adapted for a Breville oven (La Pratolina bakes in a wood fired oven).

One of the dishes featured in Katie’s book Foods of the Italian South

About this Event

Breville presents exclusive virtual pizza demonstrations + live Q&A with local legend pizza makers and pizza-related renowned cookbook authors from around the world. Join us live or watch later if you can’t make it. Each stop will be guided by Scott Wiener, a pizza expert, who runs the famous NY based Scott’s Pizza Tours and is the founder of Slice Out Hunger. Every Friday, tune in to meet pizza pros and get an in-depth view into their story and craft. From the New York Slice, Chicago Deep Dish, to the Margherita and so much more, you will learn the tips behind making each of these pies from the comfort of your own home.

Matera, a city in the region of Basilicata, in Southern Italy

All ticket proceeds are shared among our class hosts as they join efforts to benefit the pizza community. You’ll receive the recipe about an hour prior to the start of the event and a link to the recording just after the event to watch at your leisure and cook-along at your own pace. If you’re able to watch us live, take advantage of asking questions. Plus you’ll receive a special offer from Breville. So go ahead and sign-up…let’s make some (Instagram worthy) pizza!

Tickets are $25 per person, with ticket sales benefiting the charity Slice Out Hunger. More information can be found here.